More on: philosophy


Beyond Hunger

I’m so excited to be partnering with San Rafael-based non-profit Beyond Hunger for an evening of sweet vinyasa, cameraderie and conversation.

Please join us for:

Beyond Hunger: a special donation-based benefit class

Saturday
March 31st, 2012
7-9pm
Flying Yoga Shala
4308 Telegraph Avenue.
Temescal Area, Oakland, CA
— open to all, no matter how much or you little you can give!

The evening will begin with a brief informal introduction to the mission and the heart of Beyond Hunger, a non-profit whose work in eating disorder recovery encourages intuitive eating, mindfulness, and listening to the body. Rachel will then guide us through a lyrical all-levels vinyasa class from 7:30-8:30, and we’ll finish the evening with easy fellowship and light snacks.

Yoga teaches us beautifully powerful ways to better inhabit our bodies for the brief flash of time that we’re blessed to call them ours. So come breathe space and light into every corner of your life, on and off the mat. Join in community with other folks who are interested in what it looks like to live well in a body. All studio proceeds benefit Beyond Hunger.

Beyond Hunger is a non-profit organization dedicated to helping individuals overcome the obsession with food and weight and find a natural, loving and peaceful relationship with their food, weight, and selves. We provide support groups, workshops and education for adults and adolescents with eating disorders. Beyond Hunger uses a non-diet approach to explore body hatred and the psychological, cultural and spiritual issues underlying disorder eating.

Here’s a sweet blurb on Beyond Hunger’s philosophy. They do such important work. I am so excited to send a little collective support their way.

Bring a friend or six! See you on the 31st.

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The Yoga of Fight Club

I’m so excited to invite you to The Yoga of Fight Club.

Yep, you heard that right. You, me, Tyler Durden, and Marla Singer, baby. We’re gonna get our yoga on.

For over a decade now, I’ve been smitten with the complicated, smart, countercultural spirit of Chuck Palahniuk’s debut novel. His 1996 Fight Club made a splash onscreen in David Fincher’s 1999 film of the same name, and though it garnered controversy, the movie starring Brad Pitt, Edward Norton and Helena Bonham Carter has gone on to enjoy a certain cult popularity in the years since.

I love this book (and Fincher’s stylish film) for its complexity, its sexiness, its embodiment, its grit, its willingness to dive into tough questions, and its fundamental theological richness. You can come at Palahniuk’s stuff from any angle: yogic, Christian, Buddhist, Taoist, Hindu, capitalist, culture-jamming, gendered, queer, anti-consumerist, postmodern, sexualized — and find in it a screed, an inspiration, a challenge.

(Here’s an example. Hot stuff.)

So join me for for a chill evening at Flying Yoga. We’ll screen a few clips, and read a few blurbs. Tyler, Marla and I will knock out a few rounds of philosophy with you. We’ll dig into the hows and the whys of yoga philosophy, embodiment theology, and Adbusters-style culture-jamming, and consider what the hell those things might have to do with this ostensibly violent, angry, sexist film — and in so doing, argue that perhaps, in fact, that violence, that anger, that sexism, might in fact have deeper roots that might be kind of life-giving and progressive and radical (and yogic!) after all.

The Yoga of Fight Club

Saturday, April 28th. 
We break it down.
Flying Yoga Shala
4308 Telegraph Ave
7-9pm
Recommended donation: $15

But, seriously? Just pay what you can. I’d rather you be there than worry about cost. It’s not about the money. It’s about the conversation, and the company, and the bodies, and the breath. Oh, and the sexy, and the smart, too.

Page 149:

The mechanic starts talking and it’s pure Tyler Durden.

“I see the strongest and the smartest men who have ever lived, ” he says, his face outlined against the stars in the driver’s window, “and these men are pumping gas and waiting tables.”

The drop of his forehead, his brow, the slope of his nose, his eyelashes and the curve of his eyes, the plastic profile of his mouth, talking, these are all outlined in black against the stars. ….

“You have a class of young strong men and women, and they want to give their lives to something. Advertising has these people chasing cars and clothes they don’t need. Generations have been working in jobs they hate, just so they can buy what they don’t really need.

We don’t have a great war in our generation, or a great depression, but we do, we have a great war of the spirit. We have a great revolution against the culture. The great depression is our lives. We have a spiritual depression.

join us!